nitrate vault daemons

cinephilearchive:

What we have here is an Alfred Hitchcock masterpiece. Originally called ‘Uncle Charlie,’ the film would be released as ‘Shadow of a Doubt.’ In published interviews in modern sources, Hitchcock proclaimed ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ as a favorite among his own films.

In the fall of 1962, whilst ‘The Birds’ was in post-production, François Truffaut carried out extensive interviews with Alfred Hitchcock at his offices at Universal Studios. The interviews were recorded to audio tape and the content eventually edited down into the Hitchcock/Truffaut book.

François Truffaut: I take it that of all the pictures you’ve made, ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ is the one you prefer. And yet it gives a rather distorted idea of the Hitchcock touch. I feel that the film which pro­vides the most accurate image of the ensemble of your work, as well as of your style, is ‘Notorious.’
Alfred Hitchcock: I wouldn’t say that ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ is my favorite picture; if I’ve given that impres­sion, it’s probably because I feel that here is something that our friends, the plausibles and logicians, cannot complain about.
Truffaut: What about the psychologists?
Hitchcock: That’s right, the psychologists as well! In a sense, it reveals a weakness. On the one hand I claim to dismiss the plausibles, and on the other I’m worried about them. After all, I’m only human! But that impression is also due to my very pleasant memories of working on it with Thornton Wilder. In England I’d always had the collaboration of top stars and the finest writers, but in America things were quite different. I was turned down by many stars and by writers who looked down their noses at the genre I work in. That’s why it was so gratifying for me to find out that one of America’s most eminent playwrights was willing to work with me and, indeed, that he took the whole thing quite seriously.
Truffaut: Did you select Thornton Wilder or did someone suggest him to you?

Hitchcock: I wanted him. Let’s go back a little into the history of the picture. A woman called Mar­garet MacDonell, who washead of Selznick’s story department, had a husband who was a novelist. One day she told me her husband had an idea for a story but he hadn’t written it down yet. So we went to lunch at the Brown Derby and they told me the story, which we elaborated together as we were eating. Then I told  him to go home and  type it up. In this way we got the skeleton of the story into a nine-page draft that was sent to Thornton Wil­der. He  came right here, to this studio we are now in, to work on it. We worked together in the morning, and he would work on his own in the afternoon, writing by hand in a school note­ book. He never worked consecutively, but jumped about from one scene to another according to his fancy. I might add that the reason I wanted Wilder is that he had written a won­derful play called Our Town.
Truffaut: I saw Sam Wood’s screen version of that play.
Hitchcock: When the script was finished, Wilder enlisted in the Psychological Warfare Depart­ment of the U.S. Army. But I felt there was still something lacking in our screenplay, and I wanted someone  who could inject some com­edy highlights that would counterpoint the drama. Thornton Wilder had recommended an MGM writer, Robert  Audrey, but he struck me as being more inclined toward serious drama, so Sally Benson was brought in. Before the writing, Wilder  and I went to great pains to be realistic about the town, the people, and the decor. We chose a town and we went there to search for the  right house. We found one, but Wilder felt that it was too big for a bank clerk. Upon investigation it turned out that the man who lived  there was in the same financial bracket as our character, so Wilder agreed to use it. But when we came back, two weeks prior to the  shooting, the owner was so pleased that his house was going to be in a picture that he had had it completely repainted. So we had to go in  and get his permission to paint it dirty again. And when we were  through, naturally, we had it done all over again with bright, new colors.
Truffaut: The  acknowledgment to Thornton Wilder in the main credits of ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ is rather unusual.
Hitchcock: It was an emotional gesture; I was touched by his qualities.

Thornton Wilder, Sally Benson & Alma Reville’s screenplay for ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only.) Thanks to Allansfirebird and the great folks at Write to Reel.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

ninetythieves:

Hilde Körber, Peter Lorre, and Lotte Lenya in Pioniere in Ingolstadt, 1928.

ninetythieves:

Hilde Körber, Peter Lorre, and Lotte Lenya in Pioniere in Ingolstadt, 1928.

flatsc:

'The man who knew too much' 1934

flatsc:

'The man who knew too much' 1934

decayinghollywoodmansions:

German Lobby Cards for Faust (F. W. Murnau, 1926)

pennui:

Adorable Kraftwerk BBC interview with Ralf-bot.

cinefamily:

Seattle’s Pike Street Cinema, photo by Dennis Nyback

cinefamily:

Seattle’s Pike Street Cinema, photo by Dennis Nyback

damsellover:

Now that is an evil grin!  Charles Laughton with Kathleen Burke (The Panther Woman) in a still from Island of Lost Souls (1932).

damsellover:

Now that is an evil grin!  Charles Laughton with Kathleen Burke (The Panther Woman) in a still from Island of Lost Souls (1932).

torontocrow:

Original Watercolor for Frankenstein Laboratory by Kenneth Strickfaden, the genius responsible for the original machines and design of Colin Clive’s 1931 Frankenstein lab.

torontocrow:

Original Watercolor for Frankenstein Laboratory by Kenneth Strickfaden, the genius responsible for the original machines and design of Colin Clive’s 1931 Frankenstein lab.

pennui:

I once read a caption around the time Twin Peaks originally aired that referred to Kyle MacLachlan as “geeky sex god Kyle MacLachlan”. Here he is illustrating this point (with some of the Blue Velvet crew).

pennui:

I once read a caption around the time Twin Peaks originally aired that referred to Kyle MacLachlan as “geeky sex god Kyle MacLachlan”. Here he is illustrating this point (with some of the Blue Velvet crew).

cinephilearchive:

McCabe & Mrs. Miller original screenplay by Robert Altman & Brian McKay [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only) 
1970 – ’71 was definitely a high-water mark for Film Director (not to mention a badass photographer to boot) Robert Altman. Hot on the heels of M*A*S*H (1970), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) was released and became, what many consider to be, one of Warren Beatty’s finest roles, and one of the best Westerns (or anti-Western, if you will) ever made according to many film aficionados. It wasn’t your typical red-blooded Western by any stretch of the imagination. See it for yourself.

There was a definite charged energy on the set (shot completely in B.C.)– the reported tension between the egomaniac Beatty and the chill Altman– not to mention the sexual energy between Beatty and Christie, who were deep in the throes of a passionate love affair– is there any other kind of affair with Beatty? Then there’s the haunting film soundtrack including the legendary Leonard Cohen that accompanied Zsigmond’s “flashed” film negative. A truly ballsy move– Altman and Zsigmond shot the film “pre-fogged” through a number of filters to maintain the visual effect they wanted, rather than manipulate it in post-production. That ensured that studio wimps couldn’t later tune-down the film’s look to something more safe and conventional. Vilmos Zsigmond’s brilliant work would garner him a nomination by the British Academy Film Awards.

ALTMAN’S “McCABE & MRS. MILLER” | TSY REQUIRED VIEWING

cinephilearchive:

McCabe & Mrs. Miller original screenplay by Robert Altman & Brian McKay [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only) 

1970 – ’71 was definitely a high-water mark for Film Director (not to mention a badass photographer to boot) Robert Altman. Hot on the heels of M*A*S*H (1970), McCabe and Mrs. Miller (1971) was released and became, what many consider to be, one of Warren Beatty’s finest roles, and one of the best Westerns (or anti-Western, if you will) ever made according to many film aficionados. It wasn’t your typical red-blooded Western by any stretch of the imagination. See it for yourself.

image

There was a definite charged energy on the set (shot completely in B.C.)– the reported tension between the egomaniac Beatty and the chill Altman– not to mention the sexual energy between Beatty and Christie, who were deep in the throes of a passionate love affair– is there any other kind of affair with Beatty? Then there’s the haunting film soundtrack including the legendary Leonard Cohen that accompanied Zsigmond’s “flashed” film negative. A truly ballsy move– Altman and Zsigmond shot the film “pre-fogged” through a number of filters to maintain the visual effect they wanted, rather than manipulate it in post-production. That ensured that studio wimps couldn’t later tune-down the film’s look to something more safe and conventional. Vilmos Zsigmond’s brilliant work would garner him a nomination by the British Academy Film Awards.

image

ALTMAN’S “McCABE & MRS. MILLER” | TSY REQUIRED VIEWING

cinephilearchive:

In 1979, probably while filming ‘Nosferatu,’ Bruno Ganz and Klaus Kinski were hanging out in someone’s office. Check out Kinski, Adjani & Herzog on set of ‘Nosferatu.’ [Kinoimages]

“If you’ve only got 90 minutes left to live, ignore your friends, ignore your family, watch this film. Werner Herzog on his friendship with Klaus Kinski.” —My Best Fiend (Mein liebster Feind) by Werner Herzog, Part 2

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

2001italia:

Geoffrey Unsworth (right), legendary director of photography (right) on the ‘2001’ monolith excavation set at Shepperton, late december 1965 - early january 1966.

I can still remember Geoffrey wandering round the set with a slightly bemused expression, telling all and sundry: ‘I’ve been in this business for forty years — and Stanley’s just taught me something I didn’t know.’ (Arthur C. Clarke, “The ghost from the grand banks”, p.119)

2001italia:

Geoffrey Unsworth (right), legendary director of photography (right) on the ‘2001’ monolith excavation set at Shepperton, late december 1965 - early january 1966.

I can still remember Geoffrey wandering round the set with a slightly bemused expression, telling all and sundry: ‘I’ve been in this business for forty years — and Stanley’s just taught me something I didn’t know.’ (Arthur C. Clarke, “The ghost from the grand banks”, p.119)

blanchepiphanie:

The Grandmother 1970 David Lynch

blanchepiphanie:

The Grandmother 1970 David Lynch

japansocietyfilm:

Shinya Tsukamoto and Alejandro Jodorowsky together. Also they apparently had pizza together. The world is sometimes beautiful.

japansocietyfilm:

Shinya Tsukamoto and Alejandro Jodorowsky together. Also they apparently had pizza together. The world is sometimes beautiful.